Many Signs Await the Approaching Storm


Many Signs Await the Approaching Storm

As the first sign reads:

Vermilion Cliffs National Monument

Welcome to Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, an isolated and spectacular landscape. Tucked away in north-central Arizona, this Monument is a wonderland of geologic formations and rugged terrain that supports a rich array of desert wildlife and vegetation. There is even an experimental population of California condors, reintroduced to the area in 1996.
A National Treasure
Vermilion Cliffs National Monument is a geologic treasure. Its centerpiece is the majestic Paria Plateau, a grand terrace lying between two great geologic structures, the East Kaibab and Echo Cliffs monoclines. The Vermilion Cliffs, which lie along the southern and eastern edge of the Paria Plateau, rise 1,500 feet in a spectacular array of multicolored layers of shale and sandstone. Along the east side of the plateau, the Paria sedimentary rocks eroded, forming spectacular natural amphitheaters, arches and massive sandstone walls in the 2,500-foot deep canyon.
These dramatic cliffs were named by John Wesley Powell in 1869, as he embarked upon his expedition of the Grand Canyon down the Colorado River. The Monument was established on November 9, 2000, in keeping with the mission of the Bureau of Land Management National Landscape Conservation System to conserve, protect, and restore our nation’s natural treasures for present and future generations.
The colors are such as no pigment can portray. They are deep, rich, and variegated, and so luminous are they, that light seems to glow or shine out of the rock rather than to be reflected from it. Major Clarence E. Dutton, 1880.

Another sign reads:

Pioneer Roads

We found but little grass and no water to speak of, occasionally there was a little in holes along the bed of the river but it was so salty that it could not be used. We dug near the mouth of some of the large washes that came in where we found some water that was a little better. At Black Falls we found a little but it was not fit to use as the fish had died in it and it smelt very bad, like carrion.
Joseph Fish, 1879.

U.S. Highways 89 and 89A parallel the original route of the Old Arizona Road. This route was traveled many times by frontier scout Jacob Hamblin searching for a safe route to Lees Ferry and beyond. Imagine yourself traveling the Old Arizona Road on horseback or covered wagon as you continue your journey today.
Before paved roads, and air-conditioned autos, life along the Arizona Strip was more than hard. Pioneers, ranchers, and miners desperately needed communication and transportation linkages with the outside world.
Through the late 1800’s, the Old Arizona Road linked settlements along the Little Colorado River to southern Utah through Lees Ferry and Kanab. It also linked Arizona settlements to St. George. Utah, through Fredonia, Pipe Springs, and the Arizona Strip. Arizona towns like Snowflake and St. John’s sprung up after exploration of this route by Jacob Hamblin.
When the St. George Temple opened in 1877, many faithful members of teh Morman church traveled the rugged Old Arizona Road to be married in the temple. This portion of the road soon became known as the "Honeymoon Trail."
You are traveling on the only paved road across 2.8 million acres of public land managed for a variety of uses by the Arizona Strip Bureau of Land Management. In the interior of the Arizona Strip you will find 4,000 to 5,000 miles of unpaved road which require advance travel planning and precautions to ensure a safe trip.

The next sign reads:

Explorers’ Trails

"We tarried a good while…and after a lengthy conversation drew forth nothing more useful than that we had suffered the sun’s heat, which was indeed very fiery all the while the talk lasted.
Father Silvestre Velez de Escalante, 1776.

In 1776, Franciscan Fathers Francisco Atanasio Dominguez and Silvestre Velez de Escalante attempted to establish an overland route between Santa Fe and Monterey, California. They also hoped to carry their religious message to any native people they met along the way.
The journey proved more difficult than planned. Too little food, too many mountains and extreme weather caused the expedition to turn back. Though their original purpose failed, they succeeded in opening the way for continuing exploration of the area.
The road you travel today follows portions of the Dominguez – Escalante route.

The next sign reads:

Ancient Pathways

Century after century…people of many cultures followed the pathways at the base of these cliffs. Over a thousand years ago, Ancestral Puebloans (Anasazi) in this area made baskets, pottery, and clay figurines that give us clues about their daily lives. Remnants of their cliff houses can be seen throughout the Southwest.
After the Ancestral Puebloans (Anasazi) left the area, Southern Paiute people survived here by hunting, gathering, and cultivation of plants. Plants were gathered or cultivated for food, medicine, construction materials or fuel.
As European and American explorers and settlers found their way through this valley, lifestyles of the Southern Paiute changed forever.

As the final sign reads:

Vermilion Cliffs Highway

A Saga of Exploration and Survival

Welcome
Willkommen
Bienvenue

Enjoy your stop at the Dominguez-Escalante Site. While you’re here, you might also…

-Watch for condors soaring above the cliffs
-Visit nearby House Rock Valley Wildlife Area where you might see bison, deer, pronghorn, and other wildlife
-Visit House Rock Valley Overlook

Maik Tuxuvan
Kangei
Bienvenido

Posted by When lost in….. on 2011-09-22 00:25:09

Tagged: , random arizona , arizona , southwest , desert , hot , dry , arid , high desert and low desert , sand

amazing weather images – Many Signs Await the Approaching Storm #Weather #Images

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